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Careers in the Sports Industry

On and Off the Field

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Many young athletes—those who play soccer, basketball, football, baseball and other sports—dream of having professional careers someday. However, only a select few will make it to the pros. And out of those who do, those careers are often short-lived due to injuries or other career-ending problems. Does that mean dreaming about a sports-related career is a waste of time? Not at all. If you can't be on the field (or court), how about doing something off of it? There are many careers that utilize athletes' knowledge and skills.

For example, you might consider becoming a coach. What a great way to put your experience in the game you love to good use! Most entry level jobs require experience in the sport you want to coach and an exhaustive knowledge of the game is also necessary. Imagine the influence you can have on young players. If you want to work in a school you may have to get certified. Requirements vary by state.

Someone who is interested in a healthcare career might look into becoming an athletic trainer. Workers in this occupation treat athletes' injuries. Because they provide emergency treatment, they must attend sporting events. One needs a bachelor's degree to become an athletic trainer, but many people who work in this profession have a master's degree.

As an athlete, you know how to stay in great shape. Maybe you lift weights or do aerobics. Teach other people what you know by becoming a fitness trainer. You will be able to work with individuals or groups, providing both instruction and motivation. While you don't need a college degree to be a fitness trainer, many employers prefer to hire workers who have  an associate or bachelor's degree in a health or fitness major.

Do you like to talk or write about sporting events? How about becoming a sports reporter? You will get to watch sporting events and interview professional athletes and coaches. Then you will report stories either in newspapers or on websites, or during television or radio broadcasts. You will probably need to earn a bachelor's degree in journalism or communication.

If you enjoy talking about sports, another career to consider is sports announcer. There are two kinds of sports announcers: public address announcers and broadcast announcers. Public address announcers communicate with the attendees at a game, tell them about the starting lineup, announcing players as they enter the field or court and providing the play-by-play during the game. Broadcast sports announcers offer commentary and interview participants and other guests. If you want to become a broadcast sports announcer you will need to earn a bachelor's degree but public address announcers only need a high school diploma.

Resources

Associations and Organizations

Publications/Job Search Resources

The following resources provide industry news and job listings. Some allow you to post your resume. This is not an endorsement of any of these services, some of which charge a fee.

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